Latinos: Catholics favor Obama, Evangelicals Divided

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Posted October 18, 2012 by Astrid in Noticias

By: Astrid D. Rivera

Should religion be mixed with politics ?

A new survey conducted by Pew Research Center said that Catholics favor Obama while Evangelicals are divided.

Latinos are divided by religion in their preferences in the upcoming presidential election, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Three-quarters (73%) of Latino Catholics and eight-in-ten (82%) religiously unaffiliated Latinos support President Barack Obama’s re-election. However, among Latino evangelical Protestants, who account for 16% of all Latino registered voters, just 50% prefer Obama, while 39% support his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney.

These same patterns are reflected in Latinos’ partisan affiliations. Eight-in-ten (81%) religiously unaffiliated Latino voters (who make up 15% of the Latino electorate) and seven-in-ten (71%) Latino Catholics (57% of the Latino electorate) are Democrats or lean toward the Democratic Party. Among Latino evangelical voters, identification with the Democratic Party is lower—- about half (52%) are Democrats or lean Democratic, while about a third (36%) are Republicans or lean toward the Republican Party.

As the presidential election approaches, many Hispanic churchgoers say they are hearing from their clergy about various political issues and, to a lesser extent, about candidates and elections. Roughly half (54%) of Hispanics who attend religious services at least once a month say they have heard their clergy speak out about abortion, while 43% have heard from the pulpit about immigration, and 38% say their clergy have spoken out about homosexuality. A smaller proportion, roughly three-in-ten (29%), report hearing from their clergy about candidates and elections.

The new survey also finds rapidly growing support for same-sex marriage among Latinos, mirroring growing support among the general public. Half (52%) of Latinos now favor allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry legally, while one-third (34%) are opposed. As recently as 2006, these figures were reversed (56% of Latinos opposed same-sex marriage, while 31% supported it). Latino evangelicals, however, remain strongly opposed to same-sex marriage (66% opposed vs. 25% in favor).

This report is jointly produced by two projects of the Pew Research Center, the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life and the Pew Hispanic Center. It follows a Pew Hispanic Center report, released last week, about Latino voters in this year’s election. Both reports are based on a nationally representative bilingual telephone survey conducted Sept. 7-Oct. 4, 2012 (largely before the first presidential debate), among 1,765 Latino adults, including 903 registered voters. The Latino electorate today includes 23.7 million eligible voters—- an increase of more than 4 million since 2008. Overall, Latinos now account for 11% of the nation’s eligible electorate, up from 9.5% in 2008. In addition, Latinos make up at least 14% of all eligible voters in three battleground states this year—- Colorado, Florida and Nevada.

The report, “Latinos, Religion and Campaign 2012: Catholics Favor Obama, Evangelicals Divided,” is available here.

The Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, is a nonpartisan, non-advocacy research organization based in Washington, D.C. and is funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

The report, “Latinos, Religion and Campaign 2012: Catholics Favor Obama, Evangelicals Divided,” is available here. 


About the Author

Astrid

Periodista con más de 7 años de experiencia en el mundo de las comunicaciones donde ha tenido la oportunidad de entrevistar a grandes celebridades, politicos y personalidades influyentes. Ella posee un bachillerato en Periodismo y una Maestría en Periodismo Multimedios de Florida International University. En el 2012 fundó LatinBlah.com una plataforma digital dirigida al mercado hispano. Rivera también es la anfitriona del programa radial Miami Despierta.

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